Fleischmann

Fleischmann was founded in 1887 in Nuremburg, Bavaria, by Jean Fleischmann. In 1938 they took over Doll and co. and began manufacturing steam engines and accessories based on the Doll designs. Although steam toy production ended in 1969 the company is still very much in business today as a manufacturer of model railways.

Circular Saw      Sausage Maker

Windmill

Bing

The German toymaker Bing of Nuremberg was founded in the early 1860s by Ignaz and Adolf Bing. The company initially went under the name Gebrueder Bing (Bing Brothers) but following the death of Ignaz around the end of WW1 they changed their name to Bing Werke. At their height Bing was the largest toymaker in the world. The company ceased trading in 1933.

Water Wheel      Bucket Dipper

Hess

Hess Nuremberg was founded in 1826 by Mathias Hess and was one of the first German toy manufacturers. Their toys were of good quality so there are many pieces still well-preserved today. Toy production ended at the beginning of the Second World War and the company was wound up.

Oil Press

Krauss

There were three companies that operated as Krauss, Mohr & Co. From 1895 to 1903, Mohr and Krauss until 1923 and Wilhem Krauss until 1938. Over the years the various companies made a wide range of colourful steam toys.

Waterwheel

Windmill       Drop Hammer

Keim

Keim & Cie of Nuremberg, Germany, were founded in 1866, they produced cans, spinning tops, metal construction sets and tin toys. In 1938 Wilhelm Krauss & Cie were wound up and Keim took over the inventories, tools and machinery. Some Keim items produced in the early 1940s bear a strong similarity to pre-war Krauss designs.

Waterwheel

Windmill

Märklin

Märklin, one of the premier German toy makers, was founded in 1859 by Theodor Märklin and is based at Göppingen in Baden-Württemberg. From 1909 until the late 1950s they sold a range of high quality steam toys. The company is still in business today as a manufacturer of model railways.

Trip Hammers

Tekno

Tekno was founded by A. Siegumfeldt, a plumber from Copenhagen, who, after many years of producing wooden toys, began producing diecast vehicles in 1945. The company celebrated its 25th anniversary in 1953 and by this time a wide variety of trucks, tractors and cars were being produced along with other toys, including small electric motors and accessories.

From 1949 until about 1969, many models were made for Tekno by H. Langes Legetøj (Langes Toys), a diecaster in Copenhagen, with which Tekno had an agreement.

Trip Hammer

Arnold

Karl Arnold founded his company in Nuremburg in 1906. Apart from a period during both World Wars, the company continued to produce toys until the late 1950s. By that time the range included vehicles, ships and steam accessories.

From the early 1960s the company concentrated on model railways and was one of the pioneers of N gauge. Arnold model railways are still in production today and are now owned by Hornby.

Grindstone

Maker Unknown

Many of the German toy manufacturers did not put any makers marks on the accessories they produced, Therefore, it is not always possible to identify them with any certainty.

Windmill